DotNet Framework 4.5 Featured In The Daily Six Pack: 31 May, 2013

The Daily Six Pack: May 31, 2013

On 31 May, 2013 06:00:10, in The Daily Six Pack, by Dirk Strauss

DotNet Framework Featured

DotNet Framework 4.5 was released on August 15th, 2012. It included many new features and is only supported on Windows Vista or later. Microsoft started developing the .NET Framework in the late 1990s.

It was originally under the name NGWS or Next Generation Windows Services. By late 2000 the first beta versions of .NET 1.0 were released which was followed by the .NET Framework 3.0 which was included with Windows Server 2008 and Vista. The .NET Framework 3.5 is bundled with Windows 7 but can be installed on XP and Windows Server 2003.

On 12 April 2010 the .NET Framework 4 was released with Visual Studio 2010. Here are five great features of 4.5 as outlined by Shivprasad Koirala.

Next up, Tim Bush shares another great video on another awesome feature in Windows 8 called ‘File History’. This allows you to securely configure and keep a chronological history of the files on your computer. So have a look at the clip in the link below.

Lastly, it seems when enough people whine about the missing start button in Windows 8, Microsoft will pay attention. Yes, it is back in Windows 8.1 and Matt Burns details it a bit more in his post from Paul Thurrott.

Have a great day today! Here is The Daily Six Pack!

Feature link: DotNet Framework 4.5
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Dirk Strauss

Software Developer
Dirk is a Software Developer from South Africa. He loves all things Technology and is slightly addicted to Twitter and Jimi Hendrix. Apart from writing code, he also enjoys writing human readable articles. "I love sharing knowledge and connecting with people from around the world. It's the diversity that makes life so beautiful." Dirk feels very strongly that pizza is simply not complete without Tabasco, that you can never have too much garlic, and that cooking the perfect steak is an art he has yet to master.

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